What is Custody?

In a divorce between two individuals who have children, custody will be determined. In Utah divorce law, there are two types of custodies. Physical and Legal.

Custody can be difficult, but is the result of what is in the child's best interest

Physical Custody

Utah defines physical custody as “where the children live”. This means essentially which parent they spend the majority of their time with, and most “overnights”. There are three distinctions of physical custody.

  1. Sole physical custody

This does not mean one parent has the child or children 100% of the time. In Utah, if you are awarded sole physical custody, you will have the them for at 255 “overnights”. This means that the other parent will still be able to have 110 “overnights” with them as well.

  1. Joint physical custody

Each parent will have the child in their home for at least 111 “overnights” every year. This usually requires that both parents live in close proximity to each other and are able to have an open communication with each other.

  1. Split physical custody

Although rare, split custody is when the court splits children up to live with different parents. For example if a couple gets divorced and they have two kids, one will go with person A, and the other will go with person B. This doesn’t mean the kids will never see each other, it just means they have different permanent addresses.

 

Legal Custody

This type of custody refers to who has the right to make important decisions about the child. Until children are 18 years of age and considered legally adults, there will be plenty of things that need to be addressed by the legal guardian with legal custody. There are two distinct types of legal custody, and they function similarly to physical custody.

  1. Sole legal custody

Sole legal custody is essentially what it sounds like. The court may award sole legal custody to a parent meaning that one parent will be completely responsible for decisions on behalf of the child, and the other parent must defer to them.

  1. Joint legal custody

In this situation, parents must share the right to legal custody. The caveat being that a judge may give one parent the right to make specific decisions for the child, but grant the other parent the right of being the primary caregiver of the child.

This decision will be made by a judge in the best interests of the child.

 

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